Overview



What is ISPF?

ISPF stands for: Interactive System Productivity Facility. Basically, ISPF is an application which runs in TSO that allows users to access common functions that would be expected of any system. Some of these functions include: creating, modifying, and viewing data sets, excuting jobs in batch or commands via a command line, viewing job results, and many other useful utilities.

IBM defines ISPF for Z/OS by listing the following features:
  • ISPF provides facilities for all aspects of host-based software development.
    • Programmers can use ISPF to develop and document batch and interactive programs.
    • Data center administrators and system programmers can monitor and control program libraries, and communicate with MVS through TSO commands, CLISTs, or REXX EXECs.
    • Terminal users can work with interactive applications called dialogs.
    • Managers can prepare and print memos using ISPF Edit, BookMaster®, and the Hardcopy utility.

*Taken from //http://www-306.ibm.com/software/awdtools/ispf///


Main Functions in ISPF

The following are the main options (functions) that can be accessed via the main ISPF pannel:
  • 0 Settings.........................Terminal and user parameters
  • 1 View..............................Display source data or listings
  • 2 Edit................................Create or change source data
  • 3 Utilities..........................Perform utility functions
  • 4 Foreground.....................Interactive language processing
  • 5 Batch.............................Submit job for language processing
  • 6 Command.....................Enter TSO or Workstation commands
  • 7 Dialog Test......................Perform dialog testing
  • 9 IBM Products..................IBM program development products
  • 10 SCLM...........................SW Configuration Library Manager
  • 11 Workplace.....................ISPF Object/Action Workplace
  • 12 DB2..............................DB2 interactive functions
  • 13 SDSF...........................SDSF

Those options in bold have more specific definitions of functionality below beacuse they are the most frequently used (in this course).


(0) Settings:

Allows the user to make changes to the configuration and appearence of the ISPFenvironment.

The settings menu contains the following categories of options:
  • General options: command line and pannel configurations, message configuration, tabbing options etc...
  • Member list options: member list scrolling prameters etc...
  • Terminal characteristics: screen formatting
  • Print graphics: print options

*TIP: Options are chosen by placing a "/" next to the option.


(1) View:

Allows the user to view data sets and members.

To view a certain data set you must enter:
  • Project
  • Group
  • Type
  • Member (optional)

If you enter everything except the member (PDS), ISPF will return with a list of the members within the PDS (If the data set is not a PDS then the first three fields are all that is needed, and ISPF will open the data set). If you specify a member for a PDS, ISPF will open the selected member.



(2) Edit:

Allows the user to view data sets and members for editing.

*The crieiteria entered for editing a data set is the same as mentioned above when veiwing a data set.

*If you want to quickly create a new member in an existing data set the edit utility is helpful. All you have to do is enter the data set's project, group, type, and then choose a name for your new member (typed in the member field).



(3) Utilities:

Allows the user to perform many tasks; most of the functionality we use involves data sets. You want to use the utilities panel when you are creating or modifiying data sets, listing your data sets to browse, or moving or copying data sets/members.

The utilities panel contains the following sub-options (that we commonly use):
  • (2) Data Set
    • Allows you to: allocate a new data set, rename a data set, delete a data set, view a data set's information, catalog a data set, uncatalog a data set, view the short data set information, and access VSAM utilities.
    • To excecute these operations you must specify the project, group, type, and if needed the member of the data base in question.
  • (3) Move/Copy
    • Allows you to copy a data set or members, move a data set or members, and print with either of these options.
    • To execute these operations you must specify the project, group, type, and if needed the member of the data set(s) in question.
  • (4) Dslist
    • Allows you to browse your data sets in list form based on limiting criteria.
    • To execute this operation you must specify the Dsname level. (This can be blank, a HLQ, or any length of a data set definition)


*These utilities are the basic tools used to create and manage your data sets.



(6) Command:

Allows the user to enter TSO commands within ISPF.

This command shell works like any othe command line interface; in this course we have used the command line to perform interactive program excecution. You can enter any commands as you would in TSO.



(13) SDSF:

SDSF stands for Systems Display and Search Facility; it allows the user to check and maintain jobs executed in batch and view their output.

The main functionallity which we use in SDSF is:
  • View completed job's output:
    • Use the "O" command to view a list of all the completed jobs.
      • The user can filter jobs based on many things but we most commonly use a HLQ. This is done by using the filter menu and selecting option 3 (used when specifying a HLQ).
    • When a desired job is found, a "?" can be placed to the left of the job to list the sections of the job which were involved.
    • Placing an "S" next to the section of the job will show it's output.
  • Check a job's status:
    • Use the "ST" command to view the list of jobs and status.
    • *The same commands used for viewing a job's output details can be used to view status details.